New Corporate MultiCulture

To attract and retain quality employees, a primary goal of the emerging corporate culture must be to create an environment of learning, growth, and connection. It’s no longer enough to learn more technical skills or to understand growth merely as a function of job/career development. Increasingly corporations understand that learning life skills, personal growth (emotional, mental and physical wellbeing), and interpersonal skills are key to employee performance and corporate profitability – especially given the fast-growing rate of workplace diversity.

We’ve moved from agriculture to industry to the information age. Next is the age of relationships. We must know how to widely relate and communicate – not just internet but interpersonal. The successful company requires the smooth functioning of all interrelated parts and people. Relationships are important not just within sectors and strata but across departments and divisions. Salaried executives and management vs. wage-paid employees, kitchen staff vs. wait staff, black vs. white, red vs. yellow – the “us against them” thinking is too prevalent. Differences keep us apart and limit our development.

“A human being is part of the whole, called by us “universe”. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings, as something separated from the rest – a kind of optical illusion of consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison restricting us to our personal desires and to affections and connection for a few persons nearest to us. We must expand our circle…” Albert Einstein

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“Thank you for impacting my life! You have an amazing message… thanks for making a difference.” Andrea Okrogelnik, Aveda Account Executive

From Albert Einstein to Chief Seattle, Jonas Salk to Norman Lear, West African Elders to Martial Arts masters, we are told of the necessity to develop our capacity for relating to others. Discover how our individual and collective capacities – for productivity, creativity, health and profitability – are tied into our capacity for perceiving interconnectedness and bridging gaps.
“The information related to self, care for others and attitude was most useful. This seminar is much more extensive than anyone I have previously attended it embraces all areas: interpersonal, medical and others. It has been conducted in a most fruitful manner – I highly recommend it to any institution and am confident that it will help us in all the job activities.” Sakho Ibrahima, Hotel Plaza Athenee, New York

The New Corporate MultiCulture: Discovering Interconnectedness, is a program drawing from 30 years of work with internationally known physicists, physicians, brain scientists, creativity experts, corporate leaders and cultural leaders. Drawing on scientific research, time-honored teachings and decades of field reports, NCMC is about a shift in attitude, a new way of turning on the mind and accessing internal resources. Participants will expand their sense of self and their circle of “us”, while increasing capacities for innovation, for developing/attracting needed resources, for managing change and improving concentration and health behaviors.
Working in partnership projects with corporations and organizations including the Minnesota Department of Education, The Department of Public Health, US Bank (then First Bank) Minneapolis and Minnesota Business Partnership, The Continuum Center provides a new model of human capacity. With a new set of operating assumptions for achieving an effective, healthy life at work, at home, at school or in the community, the Continuum Center custom designs education, training and development programs in a variety of settings.

Jane Barrash is Executive Director of the Continuum Center in Minneapolis and has been working with leaders of science, medicine, education and business, as well as cultural leaders, since 1984. On the forefront of human capacity research, Jane has organized, developed and delivered programs and training for diverse audiences ranging from corporate and medical executives, professional athletes and teachers, to state patrol dispatchers, grade and high school students, prison inmates and the homeless.

“Many people have talked about positive thought and feelings, but no one ever gave me tools to make that happen.” Teacher – Little Hoop Tribal College

“DoS can help me get better acquainted with my supervisor, help me deal with myself and others around me, and better my lifestyle.” Paul Woodyear, Jr.

“[DoS shows] that we are all part of the circle, a part of one-another…and is an everyday living guide and inspiration to others.” Joseph Outlaw

“This program addresses a whole different aspect of one’s being, which in turn creates the possibility of a more rounded, calm and serene person who is in synch with the people around him/her.” Tubassum Husain, Jones-Harrison Residence (longest-running nursing home in MN)